The Arch of Luxembourg

The Arch of Triumph of Palmyra was unveiled on December 16th at Luxembourg. It will be at this site until February 29th, 2020. Below is some excerpts from IDA and silver history of this site. In short, it was a Catholic church turned prison turned UNESCO site. It will be up for 76 days. Let me also point out that it is once again situated near a water source. If you don’t understand what this means spiritually, you can find it all in my book.

“In collaboration with UNESCO and Luxembourg’s Neimënster Abbey, the IDA will unveil its reconstruction of Palmyra’s Triumphal Arch in the Abbey’s historic cloister on 16 December to celebrate Luxembourg’s quarter-century of UNESCO membership. Please join us! (http://digitalarchaeology.org.uk/luxembourg)

“Neimënster Abbey, an historic landmark in central Luxembourg, has a rich and complex history. The earliest records of a church on the site date back to 983 BCE. By the beginning of the 16th century, the area around the Abbey had become a thriving artisanal district. In the mid-16th century, however, fire destroyed the old Abbey. Construction on the current Abbey structure began in 1606. It remained a holy site until 1796, after which the building served variously as a garrison and a prison. In 1984, the site was redeveloped as a cultural and intellectual center, the purpose it serves today.” (via Neimënster.lu)

“After the original Benedictine abbey on the Altmünster Plateau had been destroyed in 1542, the monks built a new abbey or “Neumünster” in 1606 in the Grund. This in turn was destroyed by fire in 1684 but was rebuilt on the same site in 1688 and extended in 1720. After the French Revolution, it served as a police station and prison before becoming a barracks for the Prussians after Napoleon’s defeat in 1815. From 1867, it once again became a state prison. Since 1997, it has been the home of the European Institute of Cultural Routes. During World War II, the Nazis used the abbey to imprison political resisters to their occupation of Luxembourg.” (Wiki)

“Luxembourg City, the capital of the eponymous tiny European nation wedged between Belgium, France and Germany, is famed for its fortified medieval old town perched atop high cliffs. The extensive network of tunnels, Bock Casemates, leads to a dungeon, prison and the Archaeological Crypt, which is said to be the birthplace of Luxembourg.”

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